Friday, May 23, 2008

When Worlds Collide

As some of you might know, I practiced law for many years before becoming a full time artist. A couple of months ago I got an email asking if I would do an interview for the alumni magazine of my law school alma mater. I was a bit baffled about why they wanted to profile someone who wasn't practicing law anymore but the Communications Director assured me he thought it would make an interesting profile. Hmmmm. So, I agreed, and then sort of forgot about it until an old law school friend emailed me today to say the article was out. I think its well done, really and does a pretty good job of explaining how I got from Point A (law school) to Point B (full time artist), although that transition was a lot bumpier than described.

The article isn't on the web, although it will be eventually. Here it is, if anyone's interested in reading it. If you click on it, it should be big enough to read.

10 comments:

Stacey Peterson said...

Hi Deborah - thanks for posting this! Having come from a very corporate career to art, I thought it was interesting to read. I've always thought that the skills I picked up in my engineering education and career have been immensely valuable to me in the way I approach my painting - I can't imagine painting without having that skill set to help me solve problems. It was interesting to hear that you have some similar thoughts.

I'm happy that I got here the way I did, even if it wasn't a direct path, but isn't art just so much more fun? =)

Tracy said...

Great article, Deborah.
I. too, understand just what you mean about bringing your law skills to a painting career. I took about ten year off to be a full time mom and the things I did and learned during that time have been invaluable to me as a working artist. Took me awhile to understand that though, I was sad about "losing" all that time at first!

Deborah Paris said...

Hi Stacey. It is more fun, no doubt, but its also more difficult, more challenging and for me, more soul satisfying. You figured all that out a bit sooner than I did- lucky you!


Thanks, Tracy. I definitely agree about mourning the lost time- and coming to understand it served an important purpose.

Ed Terpening said...

Well done! As i know you're aware, another lawyer turned artist is now blogging, A. Jane Fulton.

Deborah Paris said...

Hi Ed. Yes, I have been nagging Jane to get her blog going for months now- so glad she finally made the leap!

John Campanie said...

Deborah--a lot of years have passed since the days of catching rides with you from Slingerlands as a first year. Great article and stunning work. I hope one day to view it in person. All the best.

Deborah Paris said...

Hello John. What a nice surprise to hear from you! Hope things are going well in your corner of the world and thanks very much for your kind words about my work.

Sheila Vaughan said...

Deborah, it was great to read your story like that although we have communicated about this before. As you know I also spent my working life in a totally different field helping managers to become better learners and systems thinkers. Like you and like the others I do not regret that time. We are "whole" people and what causes us to make choices comes from inner convictions I am sure whatever those choices might be. Everything in our lives informs everything else if we allow it to do so. And we should. Thanks for sharing that with us.

Deborah Paris said...

Thank you Sheila. You are so right about the "allow it to" part. I struggled against that for quite a while - and I'm not even sure why now.

Nkolika Anyabolu (MD) said...

It feels good to know that people like you (and some of those that left comments) have had the courage to make the decision to do what they're really passionate about.

I am a Medical doctor and have been painting for quite sometime now. Though I've been asked on countless occasions if I'll leave the profession to become a full time artist, I have never considered the answer to be any other than I wish to combine the 2.

Reading about your experience and journey made me smile. Hopefully I'll take the plunge someday.

Dedicated this post to you: http://art-devine-slasher.com/blog/2009/01/30/art-or-medicine/. I admire your courage and determination.